Madlener House
4 West Burton Place
Chicago, Illinois 60610
Telephone: 312.787.4071
info@grahamfoundation.org

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View of "Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form," in development, 2017, Graham Foundation, Chicago. dancer: Leah Upchurch, photo and rendering: Norman Kelley

The Master and Form, Opening Performance and Reception
Brendan Fernandes
Jan 25, 2018 (6pm)
Opening Reception

Please RSVP

Please join us for a opening performance and reception with Brendan Fernandes, Norman Kelley, and dancers from the Joffrey Academy of Dance on January 25, 2018 from 6–8:00 p.m.

For more information on the exhibition, Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form Installation in collaboration with Norman Kelley, click here.

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Andreas Angelidakis, Polemos, 2016.

Disoriented Objects
Jaffer Kolb
Feb 01, 2018 (6pm)
Talk

Please RSVP

Please join us for a talk by Jaffer Kolb, guest editor of Graham funded Log 41, which includes a special section called "Working Queer" with contributions by Ellie Abrons, Andreas Angelidakis, Annie Barrett, Caitlin Blanchfield & Farzin Lotfi-Jam, Stratton Coffman, Mustafa Faruki, Nicholas Gamso, Andrew Holder, Andrés Jaque, Jaffer Kolb & Aaron Betsky, Ang Li, Michael Meredith, Ivan L. Munuera, Joel Sanders, Rosalyne Shieh, and Michael Wang.

In the discipline of architecture, "queerness" has been understood primarily in terms of how it relates to space—from bathrooms to locker rooms; spatial transgressions to phenomenal strategies of "seeing.” But what if we understood the term less as what we design and more how. That is, to think of queerness as a methodology: a way of working, an approach to research, a framework for dealing with history. In this formulation, space opens up to a range of new kinds of practices that work across scales (from building to artifact), across media (from material assembly to performance), and across forms. Together, tactics of queerness such as humor, subversion, caricature, exaggeration, and others, can be used to disorient objects themselves: to see them anew, to give them new context, to understand how they perform as socio-cultural representations. This talk will look at a few disoriented objects as a means of unpacking the potential of this queer project—to test the theory and determine whether we can affect our tools with a renewed sense of critical action.

Jaffer Kolb is a designer based in New York and co-founder of the architectural practice N/A. He sometimes writes, sometimes curates, and often teaches (currently at Pratt Institute, and most recently at Princeton University's School of Architecture). He was the 2015 Muschenheim Fellow at the University of Michigan, and before that worked as a designer in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. His work has appeared in numerous exhibitions and has been published internationally. Previously he worked on the 13th Venice Architecture Biennial under David Chipperfield, and before that served as the US Editor of the Architectural Review. As a design journalist and critic, he has written for numerous publications internationally. He holds a Master of Architecture from Princeton University, a Master’s in Urban Planning from the London School of Economics, and his Bachelor of Arts in Film Studies from Wesleyan University.

Kolb received a Graham Foundation Exhibition grant in 2016 for Cross-Sections: Four Views of Emerging Artists and Architects with Chelsea Culprit, Ben Foch, Ian Quate, and Colleen Tuite.

This talk is presented in relationship to our concurrent exhibition, Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form, for more information click here.

Related Graham Foundation supported project:
2017 Publication grant to Anyone Corporation for Log: Observations on Architecture and the Contemporary City

 

Image: Andreas Angelidakis, Polemos, 2017, foam and vinyl seating modules, installation view, Fridericianum, Kassel, documenta 14, photo: Nils Klinger

For more information on the exhibition, Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form Installation in collaboration with Norman Kelley, click here.

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View of "Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form." 2018, Graham Foundation, Chicago. Design: Norman Kelley; dancers: Satoru Iwasaki, Yuha Kamoto, Andrea de León Rivera, Antonio Mannino, Leah Upchurch; photo: RCH

Performance followed by Brendan Fernandes in conversation with Zachary Whittenburg
Feb 10, 2018 (1pm)

Please RSVP

Please join us for a performance featuring dancers from the Joffrey Academy of Dance followed by a conversation between Brendan Fernandes and Zachary Whittenburg.

Brendan Fernandes is a Chicago-based Canadian artist of Kenyan and Indian descent. He completed the Independent Study Program of the Whitney Museum of American Art (2007) and earned his MFA from the University of Western Ontario (2005) and his BFA from York University in Canada (2002). Fernandes has exhibited widely domestically and abroad, including exhibitions at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum of Art and Design, New York; Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal; The National Gallery of Canada, Ontario; The Brooklyn Museum, New York; The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA: The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA; Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin; Bergen Kunsthall, Norway; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; The Sculpture Center, New York; The Quebec City Biennial; and the Third Guangzhou Triennial in China. His recent monograph Still Move, was published by Black Dog Press, London, fall 2016. He is currently artist-in-residence and faculty at Northwestern University in the Department of Art Theory and Practice, and is represented by Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago.

Colorado native Zachary Whittenburg spent ten years as a professional dancer with companies including Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, BJM Danse Montréal, Pacific Northwest Ballet, and Charlotte Ballet. Since then, he has collaborated with Lucky Plush Productions, Same Planet Performance Project, and Molly Shanahan / Mad Shak on performance and choreographic work; and has lectured and led workshops nationally and internationally. From 2009-12 he was the dance editor at Time Out Chicago and has written for numerous print and online publications including regular contributions to Dance Magazine. Formerly the associate director of marketing and communication at Hubbard Street Dance Company, he currently serves as the communications and engagement director at Arts Alliance Illinois. Whittenburg remains engaged with dance as a founding member of the executive committee for the Chicago Dance History Project, and serves on the artistic advisory council for High Concept Labs.

The Joffrey Academy of Dance, Official School of The Joffrey Ballet, is committed to providing students of all ages, levels and backgrounds who have a desire to dance with a world-class education built on a foundation of classical ballet. With the talents cultivated at the Joffrey Academy, students can pursue careers as professional dancers at companies throughout the world, higher education opportunities in dance, or success in other fields. Through the Joffrey Academy’s programs, students develop a diverse set of skills including artistry, creativity, discipline and confidence, among others. The Joffrey Academy’s high-quality, educational programming forms future audiences and support for the Joffrey and builds the organization’s reputation worldwide.

Image: View of "Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form." 2018, Graham Foundation, Chicago. Design: Norman Kelley; dancers: Satoru Iwasaki, Yuha Kamoto, Andrea de León Rivera, Antonio Mannino, Leah Upchurch; photo: RCH

For more information on the exhibition, Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form Installation in collaboration with Norman Kelley, click here.

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MASTERING FORM: Considering Architecture, Object and Body in the work of Brendan Fernandes
Hendrik Folkerts
Feb 15, 2018 (6pm)
Talk

Please RSVP

Please join us as curator Hendrik Folkerts reflects on architecture, object, and body in the work of Brendan Ferndandes in a new talk prepared in response to our current exhibition The Master and Form. The talk will be followed by a Q&A and conversation between Folkerts and Fernandes.

Hendrik Folkerts is the Dittmer Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Art Institute of Chicago and one of the curators of documenta 14, which took place in Kassel and Athens in 2017. He studied Art History at the University of Amsterdam, specializing in contemporary art and theory, feminist practices, and performance. From 2010 until 2015 he was curator of Performance, Film & Discursive Programs at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Prior to this, Folkerts was coordinator of the Curatorial Program at De Appel arts centre in Amsterdam from 2009 until 2011. He frequently publishes in journals and magazines such as South as a State of Mind, Mousse Magazine, ArtforumThe ExhibitionistMetropolis MThe Journal for Art and Public SpaceAfterall Online, as well as monographs and exhibition catalogues. Folkerts is co-editor of Shadowfiles: Curatorial Education (Amsterdam: de Appel arts centre, 2013) with Ann Demeester; and Facing Forward: Art & Theory from a Future Perspective (Amsterdam: AUP, 2015) with Christoph Lindner and Margriet Schavemaker. He is one of the founding editors of the peer-reviewed journal Stedelijk Studies.

Image: View of "Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form." 2018, Graham Foundation, Chicago. Design: Norman Kelley; dancers: Satoru Iwasaki, Yuha Kamoto, Andrea de León Rivera, Antonio Mannino, Leah Upchurch; photo: RCH

For more information on the exhibition, Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form Installation in collaboration with Norman Kelley, click here.

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Thomas Lehn and Marcus Schmickler
Lampo Performance Series
Feb 17, 2018 (8pm)

RSVP Required

Thomas Lehn and Marcus Schmickler have worked together since 1998. In their long musical collaboration, they confront intrinsically different instruments—for Thomas, the modular synthesizer, and for Marcus, the computer—with a common understanding of real-time composition and a shared admiration for subtle degrees of musical intensity.

Here, the analog-digital duo premieres Prediction Control Allocation—a three-part improvisation and a new performance strategy, with each section exploring a different musical form. Lehn and Schmickler take their cue from Point Line Cloud by composer and researcher Curtis Roads, while referencing the formal ideas of Stockhausen, Xenakis and Ligeti. Sounds scatter, fuse and then mutate, as they flow into other sounds.

Thomas Lehn (b.1958, Fröndenberg, Germany) has been working as a performer, interpreter, composer, and improviser of contemporary music since the early 1980s. Rooted in the experience of a wide spectrum of musical fields and based on his background as a pianist, he has developed an individual "language" of electronic music. The electronic equipment he uses consists of analog synthesizers from the late 1960s, particularly the EMS Synthi A. The specific character of this modular instrument allows him to act and react spontaneously in close contact with the various structural degrees of the musical process.

Marcus Schmickler (b.1968, Cologne, Germany) studied composition and electronic music and works in both composed and improvised forms. He has won numerous prizes and honors and is closely associated with the Cologne label a-Musik. As a composer along with his many works of electronic music, he works with the ensemble recherche, the Staatskapelle Weimar, the musikFabrik, the Paragon Ensemble, the Ensemble Zeitkratzer, among others. As a musician he works with artists such as John Tilbury, Thomas Lehn, MIMEO and Julee Cruise. His discography consists of over 50 titles, and he has performed internationally. He lives and works in Cologne.

Thomas Lehn and Marcus Schmickler performed at Lampo in September 2005, later released on Navigation Im Hypertext (a-Musik). Lehn's Lampo debut dates back to May 2003. Schmickler has performed several times in the Lampo series, first in September 2002 and most recently in March 2014.

Support for this program is provided by the Goethe-Institut of Chicago and the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. Since 2010 the Graham Foundation has supported and partnered with Lampo to produce this performance series held at the Madlener House. Lampo, founded in 1997, is a non-profit organization for experimental music and intermedia projects.

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Performance: The Master and Form
Mar 10, 2018 (1pm)

Please RSVP

Please join us for the next performance related to our current exhibition, Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form featuring dancers from the Joffrey Academy of Dance. The durational performance will activate the installation, designed in collaboration with Norman Kelley.

The Joffrey Academy of Dance, Official School of The Joffrey Ballet, is committed to providing students of all ages, levels and backgrounds who have a desire to dance with a world-class education built on a foundation of classical ballet. With the talents cultivated at the Joffrey Academy, students can pursue careers as professional dancers at companies throughout the world, higher education opportunities in dance, or success in other fields. Through the Joffrey Academy’s programs, students develop a diverse set of skills including artistry, creativity, discipline and confidence, among others. The Joffrey Academy’s high-quality, educational programming forms future audiences and support for the Joffrey and builds the organization’s reputation worldwide.

Image: View of "Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form." 2018, Graham Foundation, Chicago. Installation in collaboration with Norman Kelley; dancers: Satoru Iwasaki, Yuha Kamoto, Andrea de León Rivera, Antonio Mannino, Leah Upchurch; photo: RCH

For more information on the exhibition, Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form Installation in collaboration with Norman Kelley, click here.

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Keep Walking Intently: The Ambulatory Art of the Surrealists, the Situationist International, and Fluxus
Lori Waxman
Mar 19, 2018 (6pm)
Book Launch

Please RSVP

Please join us for a series of ambulatory performances to launch Lori Waxman's new Graham-funded book Keep Walking Intently: The Ambulatory Art of the Surrealists, the Situationist International, and Fluxus, just out from Sternberg Press, Berlin. Throughout the evening works by Vito Acconci, William Anastasi, La Monte Young, Anna Halprin, Daniel Buren, Irena Haiduk, and George Brecht, among others, will be performed.

Performers include Aram Atamian, Jane Thompson, Udita Upadhyaya, Phoebe Chin, Sophie Leddick, Mie Frederikke Fischer Christensen, Calla Dobmeyer, Maryam Faridani, Jordan Miller, Jose Perez, Solomon Salim Moore, Yewen Dong, Nanna Rosenfeldt-Olson and Lori Waxman.

Lori Waxman has been art critic for the Chicago Tribune for eight years. She teaches art history and criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and has a PhD from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She is coauthor of Girls! Girls! Girls! in Contemporary Art (2011) and Talking with Your Mouth Full: New Language for Socially Engaged Art (2008). She received a Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant for her performance 60 wrd/min art critic, which was included in dOCUMENTA (13) and later published as an artist’s book by Onestar Press.


Image:“Free Flux-Tours,” poster, designed by George Maciunas, 1976.

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Michelle Grabner in conversation with John Riepenhoff, Jennifer Reeder, Anne Wilson, Tony Tassett and Nate Young
FRONT International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art
Mar 26, 2018 (6pm)
Panel Discussion

RSVP Required

Join us for an evening with Graham grantee FRONT International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art in anticipation of its inaugural edition, An American City, taking place throughout the summer of 2018 with new work by over 60 artists, six major exhibitions, and site-specific installations around the city of Cleveland and Northeast Ohio.

Artistic Director Michelle Grabner will be in conversation with FRONT participating artists John Riepenhoff, Jennifer Reeder, Anne Wilson, Tony Tasset and Nate Young to discuss how artist projects are shaped within the triennial structure in addition to the ever-changing, politically urgent conditions of An American City.

Michelle Grabner is a celebrated American painter and conceptual artist. Her work has been featured in notable national and international collections. Grabner co-curated the 2015 Whitney Biennial and recently curated the Portland 2016 Biennial. Grabner is the Crown Family Professor of Painting and Drawing at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. With her husband, Brad Killam, she co-directs the the Suburban in Milwaukee and the Poor Farm in Little Wolf, Wisconsin.

Related Graham Foundation supported projects:
2017 Publication Grant to FRONT Exhibition Company for An American City: Exhibition Catalogue and Guide

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Chicago Art Critics Forum: Salon Review
THE SEEN
Apr 03, 2018 (6pm)
Panel Discussion

Please RSVP via email

THE SEEN and EXPO CHICAGO, in collaboration with the Graham Foundation, present the Chicago Art Critics Forum. Now in its seventh edition, Salon Review convenes a live panel of contemporary critics to discuss exhibitions currently on display in Chicago. Centered around the materiality of experience, Howardena Pindell’s retrospective at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Mounira Al Solh’s work at the Art Institute of Chicago, the experimental paintings of Sam Gilliam, Alan Shields, and Frank Stella at the Block Museum of Art's Katz Gallery, and the group exhibition Unthought Environments at the Renaissance Society will be discussed. 

Panelists include Elliot Reichert (Newcity), Abigail Winograd (Artforum.com), and Ruslana Lichtzier (THE SEEN). Hosted by Stephanie Cristello, Editor-in-Chief of THE SEEN.

RSVP to theseen@expochicago.com

THE SEEN, Chicago’s International Journal of Contemporary & Modern Art, features in-depth writing on exhibitions, as well as highlight essays, artist profiles, and reviews. Publishing twice a year in print, in addition to monthly online issues, the free, full-color, 150+ page journal is produced in a limited-edition 10,000-count run, and is available for distribution at multiple public locations throughout the city of Chicago, as well as select national and international distribution.

With a network of Staff Writers reporting from around the world, THE SEEN features exclusive pieces and new commissions on the best in international contemporary art. THE SEEN is published by EXPO CHICAGO and led by Editor-in-Chief, Stephanie Cristello. Issue 06 will launch in print April 2018, with exclusive pieces and new commissions on the best in international contemporary art, featuring Brendan Fernandes on the cover to align with his recent exhibition, The Master and Form, at the Graham Foundation.

Free copies of Issues 04 and 05 of THE SEEN will be available for distribution.

Image: Howardena Pindell, Video Drawings: Swimming, 1975. Chromogenic development print; framed: 13 15/16 × 16 1/16 in. (35.4 × 40.8 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Anixter Art Acquisition Fund, 2016.6. Courtesy the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York.

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Final Performance: The Master and Form
Apr 05, 2018 (6pm)

Please RSVP

Please join us for the final performance related to our current exhibition, Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form featuring dancers from the Joffrey Academy of Dance. The durational performance will activate the installation, designed in collaboration with Norman Kelley.

The Joffrey Academy of Dance, Official School of The Joffrey Ballet, is committed to providing students of all ages, levels and backgrounds who have a desire to dance with a world-class education built on a foundation of classical ballet. With the talents cultivated at the Joffrey Academy, students can pursue careers as professional dancers at companies throughout the world, higher education opportunities in dance, or success in other fields. Through the Joffrey Academy’s programs, students develop a diverse set of skills including artistry, creativity, discipline and confidence, among others. The Joffrey Academy’s high-quality, educational programming forms future audiences and support for the Joffrey and builds the organization’s reputation worldwide.

Image: View of "Brendan Fernandes: The Master and Form." 2018, Graham Foundation, Chicago. Installation in collaboration with Norman Kelley; dancers: Satoru Iwasaki, Yuha Kamoto, Andrea de León Rivera, Antonio Mannino, Leah Upchurch; photo: RCH

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Dysfunctional Plans
Fosco Lucarelli
Apr 19, 2018 (6pm)
Talk

Please RSVP

Renewed Archetypes, Endless Enclosure, Mystical Grid, Transient Monument, Inhabitable Wall, Dysfunctional Plan

Join us for a talk by Fosco Lucarelli, the 2017–18 Douglas A. Garofalo Fellow from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) School of Architecture.

Dysfunctional Plans is a theoretical inquiry based on seven design exercises made in collaboration with a group of Lucarelli’s students. The project’s unwieldy brief provides no a priori function, content, strategy, site, or hypothetical condition apart from the arbitrary definition of seven oxymoronic images.

More an experiment than a manifesto, this talk and accompanying exhibition at UIC questions whether architecture might be a discipline autonomous enough to create its own narrative, content, function, purpose, and imagination—and therefore, meaning—stemming solely from its bare form.

Fosco Lucarelli is an Italian architect and educator based in Paris. He holds a Bachelor and Master of Architecture from the School of Architecture of Rome (Roma Tre) and from the ETSAM in Madrid. With his partner Mariabruna Fabrizi, he co-founded the architectural practice Microcities, and conducts independent research through the website SOCKS. He has taught at the École d'architecture de la ville et des territoires in Marne-La-Vallée in Paris, and at the École Polytechnique Fédérale in Lausanne. Together with M. Fabrizi, Lucarelli was the content-curator for "The Form of Form", the main exhibition at the 2016 Lisbon Architecture Triennale, and he is part of the chief curatorial team for the 2019 Lisbon Triennale.

About the Douglas A. Garofalo Fellowship
Named in honor of architect and educator Doug Garofalo (1958–2011), this nine-month teaching fellowship—supported with a grant from the Graham Foundation—provides emerging designers the opportunity to teach studio and seminar courses in the undergraduate and graduate programs and conduct independent design research. The fellowship also includes a public lecture at the Graham Foundation and an exhibition at the UIC School of Architecture. To learn more about the fellowship, click here.

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Sarah Davachi
Lampo Performance Series
Apr 21, 2018 (8pm)

RSVP Required

Canadian composer Sarah Davachi returns to Chicago and presents new work for reed organ, violin, viola da gamba and electronics. Based upon variously displaced melodic movements that were originally developed through a series of improvisations for pipe organ, this piece attempts to balance instances of consonance and dissonance, both in frequency content and physical gesture between its three players.

The open strings of the violin and viola da gamba—a Renaissance-Baroque instrument with seven strings tuned in a manner similar to the lute and modern guitar—are often isolated in order to fully emphasize the natural harmonics of the resonating body. The electronic component, originally derived from an EMS Synthi synthesizer, reinforces many of these pitches but occupies a subtle and unstable presence in the mix, slightly blurring the source of the effect.

Joining Davachi in this performance are Chicagoans Whitney Johnson on violin and Phillip Serna on viola da gamba.

Sarah Davachi
(b.1987, Calgary, Canada) is a composer of electronic and electroacoustic music. Trained at Mills College, she is engaged in practices of analog synthesis, psychoacoustic manipulations, multi-channel sound diffusion, and studio composition. Her compositional projects are primarily concerned with disclosing the antiquated instruments and forgotten sonics of a bygone era in synthesis, with concurrent treatment of acoustic sources—particularly organs, strings and woodwinds. Since 2007, she also has worked for the National Music Centre in Canada as a researcher and archivist of their collection of acoustic and electronic keyboard instruments. She has held artist residencies at the Banff Centre for Arts; EMS, Stockholm; OBORO, Montreal; and STEIM, Amsterdam. Davachi currently lives in Los Angeles, where she is a doctoral student in musicology.

Sarah Davachi made her Chicago debut at Lampo in January 2017, with a new composition for vintage synthesizers, harmonium and two cellos.

Since 2010 the Graham Foundation has supported and partnered with Lampo to produce this performance series held at the Madlener House. Lampo, founded in 1997, is a non-profit organization for experimental music and intermedia projects.

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Torkwase Dyson, “Looking for the People (Water Table Ocular #3),” 2017. Polymer gravure on Hahnmuhle Copperplate White paper. Published by Brodsky Center. Collaborating Master Printer Randy Hemminghaus. Photograph courtesy of Brodsky Center. Copyright Torkwase Dyson and Brodsky Center. Photo by Peter Jacobs

Opening Reception: Torkwase Dyson and the Wynter-Wells School
May 03, 2018 (6pm)

Please RSVP

Please join us for a reception with artist Torkwase Dyson as we celebrate the opening of her new installation.

Torkwase Dyson, born in Chicago, is an artist based in New York whose practice draws on her interest in abstraction, social architecture, and environmental justice. She began engaging social architecture through her project Studio South Zero (2014–ongoing), a mobile studio that relies on solar power and supports multidisciplinary artmaking. Recent solo exhibitions of Dyson’s work have been presented at the Drawing Center, New York City; Landmark Gallery, Texas Tech University, Lubbock; Eyebeam, Brooklyn; and the Meat Market Gallery, Washington, DC. Her work has also been included in exhibitions in New York at the Whitney Museum of American Art; the Studio Museum in Harlem; Martos Gallery; Postmasters Gallery; and We Buy Gold, Brooklyn as well as at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, Philadelphia, and the National Museum of African Art, Washington DC. Dyson’s work has been supported by the Joan Mitchell Foundation; Nancy Graves Foundation; Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University; and the Lower Manhattan Cultural Center. She is on the board of the Architectural League of New York and is a visiting critic at the Yale University School of Art. She is represented by Davidson Contemporary, New York; and Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago.

For more information on the exhibition, Wynter-Wells School, click here.

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Entangled Urbanisms: History, Place, and the Shaping of Cities
Reinhold Martin, Nancy Steinhardt, and Kenny Cupers
May 17, 2018 (6pm)

Please RSVP

This symposium will bring together a roster of international scholars to examine challenges and opportunities presented by the comparative study of cities across the globe from the sixteenth century to the present. The opening panel discussion at the Graham Foundation will feature Reinhold Martin, Nancy Steinhardt, and Kenny Cupers.

Reinhold Martin is Professor of Architecture at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at Columbia University and Director of the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture.

Nancy Steinhardt is Chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Pennsylvania and Professor of East Asian Art in Penn’s History of Art Department.

Kenny Cupers is Head of Urban Studies and Professor of History and Theory of Architecture at the University of Basel, Switzerland.

Ayala Levin, Assistant Professor in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University, will moderate the panel.

The symposium continues on May 18 at the Northwestern University Library in Evanston. The event at Northwestern is free but separate registration is required. To register for the full symposium, click here.

Image: Left: Vassallieu dit Nicolay, Map of Paris, 1609. Bibliothèque national de France, Paris; right: Aerial view of Chicago. Jesús Escobar

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Automatic Architecture
Sean Keller
May 23, 2018 (6pm)
Book Launch

Please RSVP

Join us for a talk by Sean Keller to launch his new Graham-funded book Automatic Architecture: Motivating Form after Modernism recently published by University of Chicago Press.

Automatic Architecture examines architects’ enthusiasm for autonomic design methods in the 1960s and 1970s. Influenced by the new science of computing, these architects tried to replace individual intuition with methods that were thought to be objective, logical, or natural. The book closes with an analysis of our contemporary condition, suggesting paths for architectural practice that work through, but also beyond, the merely automatic.

Sean Keller is a historian and critic of modern and contemporary architecture. His writing has been recognized by a Winterhouse Award for Design Writing and Criticism and by a Warhol Foundation Grant. He is the author of Automatic Architecture: Motivating Form After Modernism (University of Chicago Press, 2018); and is currently completing a book on the art and architecture of the 1972 Munich Olympics (forthcoming, with Christine Mehring, Yale University Press).

Keller is Associate Professor, Associate Dean of Research, and Director of the MS program at the IIT College of Architecture. He has taught at the University of Chicago, Yale University, and Harvard University. He is a Fellow of the Neubauer Collegium and formerly a Residential Scholar of the Franke Institute for the Humanities, both at the University of Chicago. He is a trustee of the Graham Foundation.


Image: Grid-shell forms determined by hanging chain nets, the Institute for Lightweight Structures, Stuttgart, 1974. Courtesy of ILEK, University of Stuttgart.

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Mitch

Mitch McEwen
May 31, 2018 (6pm)
Talk

Please RSVP

Urban designer and professor of architecture, Mitch McEwen presents an original lecture responding directly to the exhibition Torkwase Dyson and the Wynter-Wells School. Building on ongoing discussions with Dyson, McEwen examines experimentation, design, and how transformative events, such as climate change, can incite change in architecture and urban studies. Components of this commissioned lecture and elements of the intellectual partnership between McEwen and Dyson will be presented as part of the Graham-published book that accompanies Dyson’s exhibition and fellowship.

V. Mitch McEwen is principal of McEwen Studio and co-founder of A(n) Office, a collaborative of design studios in Detroit and New York City.  McEwen’s work has been awarded grants from the Graham Foundation, Knight Foundation, and New York State Council on the Arts.  A(n) Office and McEwen Studio projects have been commissioned by the US Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale, the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, and the Istanbul Design Biennial. McEwen’s work in urban design and architecture began at Bernard Tschumi Architects and the New York City Department of City Planning, as well as founding the Brooklyn-based non-profit SUPERFRONT. McEwen earned her MArch at Columbia University and BA at Harvard College cum laude in Social Studies.  Since 2017 she has been Assistant Professor at Princeton School of Architecture, after teaching previously at University of Michigan and Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. Since 2017, McEwen serves as a Board Member of the Van Alen Institute in New York City.

This talk is presented in conjunction with our current exhibition Torkwase Dyson and the Wynter-Wells School.

For more information on the exhibition, Wynter-Wells School, click here.

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Christina

Christina Sharpe and Torkwase Dyson in Conversation
Jun 14, 2018 (6pm)
Talk

Please RSVP

Join us for an evening of discussion with scholar Christina Sharpe and artist Torkwase Dyson. First introduced through the Center for African American Poetry & Poetics at the University of Pittsburgh’s program, Unruly Collaborations, Sharpe and Dyson continue their conversation at the Graham Foundation. Both share interests in tackling meaningful and ethically responsible ways to wrestle with the many challenging issues of contemporary society, including those influenced by post-civil rights and postcolonial landscapes.

Christina Sharpe is Professor of English, Africana, and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Tufts University. In July she will join the faculty of York University in Toronto as Professor in the Department of Humanities. Her second book, In the Wake: On Blackness and Being, was published by Duke University Press in November 2016 and was named in the Guardian newspaper and The Walrus as one of the best books of 2016. In the Wake was also chosen as a finalist in the category of nonfiction for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Awards. Her first book, Monstrous Intimacies: Making Post-SlaverySubjects was published in 2010, also by Duke University Press. She is currently completing the critical introduction to the Collected Poems of Dionne Brand (1982–2010) to be published by Duke University Press. She is also working on a monograph: Black. Still. Life. She has recently contributed essays to the book accompanying Arthur Jafa’s first solo exhibition Love is the Message, The Message is Death and an essay called “The Crook of Her Arm” for a collection on the work of the artist Martine Syms.

This talk is presented in conjunction with our current exhibition Torkwase Dyson and the Wynter-Wells School.

For more information on the exhibition, Wynter-Wells School, click here.

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Graham Lambkin & Joe McPhee
Lampo Performance Series
Jun 16, 2018 (8pm)
Performance

RSVP Required

Join us for a new performance by Graham Lambkin and Joe McPhee. In 1993 one of the chief concerns of Graham Lambkin’s then fledgling group Shadow Ring was to emulate, on a cheap Casio keyboard, the electronic textures of ’70s Joe McPhee collaborator John Snyder’s ARP synthesizer. Twenty-two years later Lambkin and McPhee recorded their Chance Meeting album using chimes, whistle, pocket synthesizer, tape, Baoding balls and other objects. The recording is marked by the jovial spirit and wry humor that characterizes their collaborative dynamic, both in performance and friendship.

Graham Lambkin (b.1973, Dover, England) is a multidisciplinary artist who first came to prominence in the early 90s through the formation of his experimental music group The Shadow Ring. A sound organizer rather than music maker, Lambkin looks at an everyday object and sees an ocean of possibility, continually transforming quotidian atmospheres and the mundane into expressive sound art using tape manipulation techniques, chance operations and the thick ambience of domestic field recordings.

Joe McPhee (b.1939, Miami, Fla.) has been a deeply emotional composer, improviser and multi-instrumentalist since his emergence on the creative jazz and new music scenes in the late 60s. Inspired by the music of Albert Ayler, he taught himself the saxophone and proceeded to cut two records that remain defining monuments to the civil rights era: the out free jazz of Underground Railroad and avant-funk of Nation Time. His odyssey since has taken McPhee through Deep Listening collaborations with Pauline Oliveros and countless left field improv sessions both within and way outside of the jazz tradition.

Since 2010 the Graham Foundation has supported and partnered with Lampo to produce this performance series held at the Madlener House. Lampo, founded in 1997, is a non-profit organization for experimental music and intermedia projects.

Image: Courtesy Steve Louie

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Photo: Jason Chow

The Shape of Language
Dionne Brand
Jun 16, 2018 (3pm)

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The poet Dionne Brand delivers a talk and shares selections from her forthcoming book, The Blue Clerk (Duke). Brand’s presentation—commissioned by the Graham Foundation in partnership with the Poetry Foundation—weaves narratives between Brand and the artist Torkwase Dyson as both address the language of shapes. Selections of this talk will be included in the Wynter-Wells School publication that will be published at the conclusion of the exhibition at the Madlener House.

Dionne Brand is a Canadian poet. Born in Trinidad, Brand attended the University of Toronto earning degrees in Philosophy and English and a Masters in the Philosophy of Education. Her books of poetry include No Language Is Neutral, a finalist for the Governor General’s Award; Land to Light On, winner of the Governor General’s Award and the Trillium Award; and thirsty, finalist for the Griffin Prize and winner of the Pat Lowther Award for poetry. Brand is also the author of the acclaimed novels In Another Place, Not Here, which was shortlisted for the Chapters/Books in Canada First Novel Award and the Trillium Award, and At the Full and Change of the Moon. Her works of non-fiction include Bread Out of Stone and A Map to the Door of No Return. In addition to her literary accomplishments, Brand is Professor of English in the School of English and Theatre Studies at the University of Guelph.

The Poetry Foundation, publisher of Poetry magazine, is an independent literary organization committed to a vigorous presence for poetry in our culture. It exists to discover and celebrate the best poetry and to place it before the largest possible audience.

For more information on the exhibition, Wynter-Wells School, click here.

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Global Warming, Uneven Development, and New Geographies with Amanda Williams
Wynter-Wells Drawing School for Environmental Liberation
Jun 20, 2018
Workshop

RSVP Required

Workshop: 9 a.m.-12 p.m., limited capacity

This workshop asks participants to consider points of entry into urgent questions, such as what is global warming? What is climate change? How are they different and what do they have to do with uneven development and geography? This open discussion addresses these questions through drawing as they relate to time, motion, and transparency, as well as the distribution of energy and resources.

Through cross-disciplinary collaboration, drawing exercises, and discussion, this workshop led by Torkwase Dyson in partnership with Amanda Williams asks participants to reconsider “the things the mind already knows,” a principle Dyson borrows from the artist Jasper Johns regarding innovation in approaching familiar objects or concepts.

Intimate afternoon workshop sessions will be followed by public evening presentations. No artistic experience is required for the workshops, though willingness to participate in both the discussions and artistic exercises is expected. Any specific instructions related to the workshop will be sent following confirmation of attendance. All workshops are free, but RSVP is required and space is limited.

Amanda Williams is a visual artist who trained as an architect. Her practice blurs the distinction between art and architecture through works that employ color as a way to draw attention to the political complexities of race, place, and value in cities. The landscapes in which she operates are the visual residue of the invisible policies and forces that have misshapen most inner cities. Williams’ installations, paintings, video, and works on paper seek to inspire new ways of looking at the familiar, and in the process, raise questions about the state of urban space in America. Amanda has exhibited widely, including the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale, a solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, The Art Institute of Chicago, and the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis. She is a 2018 United States Artists Fellow, a Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters & Sculptors grantee, an Efroymson Family Arts Fellow, a Leadership Greater Chicago Fellow, and a member of the multidisciplinary Exhibition Design team for the Obama Presidential Center. She has served as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Architecture at Cornell University and Washington University in St. Louis. She lives and works on Chicago’s south side.

Image: Color(ed) Theory Series: Flamin' Red Hots (Demolition Bus), 2018. Image courtesy of the Artist and Rhona Hoffman Gallery.

For more information on the exhibition, Wynter-Wells School, click here.

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Nomadicity, Movement, and Improvisation with Andres L. Hernandez and Zachary Fabri
Wynter-Wells Drawing School for Environmental Liberation
Jun 29, 2018
Performance

RSVP Required

Workshop: 1–4 p.m., sold out
Performance and Panel Discussion: 6 p.m.


At a time when mass migration due to the effects of climate change has become a critical concern, artist, and designer Andres L. Hernandez, and artist and dancer Zachary Fabri ask how drawing can can be used as an interpretative act of movement to address pressing global issues.

Workshop
Through cross-disciplinary collaboration, drawing exercises, and discussion, this workshop led by Torkwase Dyson in partnership with Andres Luis Hernandez and Zachary Fabri asks participants to reconsider “the things the mind already knows,” a principle Dyson borrows from the artist Jasper Johns regarding innovation in approaching familiar objects or concepts.

No artistic experience is required for the workshop, though willingness to participate in both the discussions and artistic exercises is expected. All workshops are free, but RSVP is required and space is limited.

Performance and Panel Discussion
After the workshop, Hernandez and Fabri will present a new collaborative performance, followed by a panel discussion with Torkwase Dyson and D Soyini Madison.

Andres Luis Hernandez is an artist and educator committed to collaborative and community-based work, currently working on a range of projects with the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs. His work explores ways that private and public spaces are used to promote and sustain injustice, often taking the form of archival research, writing, public programming, participatory workshops, ephemeral interventions, and performances within the built environment. Hernandez received his Bachelor of Architecture degree from Cornell University and an MA in art education from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he is an assistant professor in the Department of Art Education.

Zachary Fabri is an artist working in video, photography and drawing. He has been awarded The Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award, the Franklin Furnace Fund for Performance Art and the New York Foundation for the Arts fellowship in interdisciplinary work. Fabri’s work has been exhibited at Art in General, The Studio Museum in Harlem, El Museo del Barrio, The Walker Art Center, The Brooklyn Museum, The Barnes Foundation, Rockelmann & gallery, and Third Streaming. He has collaborated in multidisciplinary projects with choreographer Joanna Kotze at the Baryshnikov Arts Center, and most recently with artist Torkwase Dyson at the Drawing Center in 2018. Currently, he is making drawings on napkins he stole from the Trump Soho Hotel while working as a bus boy. Fabri lives and works in Flatbush Brooklyn.

D. Soyini Madison is professor of Performance Studies, with appointments in the Department of African American Studies and the Department of Anthropology at Northwestern University. Madison has lived and worked in Ghana, as a Senior Fulbright Scholar conducting field research on the interconnections between traditional religion, political economy, and indigenous performance tactics.

Image: Andres L. Hernandez, Untitled (Study for "JRRNYYMNN" in Hammons blue), 2018. Digital edit of photocopy on paper, dimensions variable

For more information on the exhibition, Wynter-Wells School, click here.

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Architecture and Liquidity with Ron Henderson
Wynter-Wells Drawing School for Environmental Liberation
Jul 11, 2018
Workshop

RSVP Required

Workshop: 1–5 p.m., sold out
Talk: 6 p.m.

What types of energy are available to us and why should we diversify and use less? This intimate afternoon workshop session will be followed by a public evening presentation investigating diverse sources of energy and their site-specific pros and cons.

Led by landscape architect Ron Henderson and artist Torkwase Dyson, the workshop considers hydroelectric power and the gravitational potential of energy as a way to examine state changes in matter and liquid. Participants use the fundamental logic of elevation drawing to think through the science of water and the way in which it shapes space.

Ron Henderson is professor and director of the graduate program in landscape architecture and urbanism at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. He is also founding principal of L+A Landscape Architecture, which has received many international, national, and regional awards, including nominations in 2013 and 2017 for the European Union Urban Prize. He is Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects, a Creative Artist Fellow at the US–Japan Friendship Commission, Senior Fellow of Garden and Landscape Studies at Dumbarton Oaks, and author of The Gardens of Suzhou, published by the University of Pennsylvania Press. He received a Graham Foundation grant in 2018 for the program series, "Alfred Caldwell and the Performance of Democracy.”


Image: Excerpt from Henderson's orihon, or folding sketchbooks, include an investigation of water sequences at Ise Shrine in Japan

For more information on the exhibition, Wynter-Wells School, click here.

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Richard Rezac: Address
Jul 26, 2018 (6pm)
Book Launch

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Please join us to celebrate the launch of Richard Rezac: Address, a new publication documenting and expanding on the artist’s Renaissance Society exhibition. The catalogue features a generous selection of images, a conversation between the artist and curator Solveig Øvstebø, and new texts by Jennifer R. Gross, James Rondeau, and Matthew Goulish. Hosted in partnership with the Renaissance Society, this evening features a reading by Matthew Goulish.

Richard Rezac lives and works in Chicago. His sculpture has been shown nationally and internationally, most notably in a 2006 survey of his work at the Portland Art Museum. He has recently exhibited at James Harris Gallery, Seattle (2017), the DePaul Art Museum, Chicago (2016), Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin (2015), Marc Foxx, Los Angeles (2015), and Rhona Hoffman Gallery (2014). Rezac has received fellowship grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Joan Mitchell Foundation, and the Tiffany Foundation, and in 2006, the Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome. He is an adjunct professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Matthew Goulish is co-founder and dramaturg of the performance group Every house has a door, and teaches in the Writing Program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. 

The Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago presents contemporary art exhibitions, events, and publications. “The Ren”—as it is known by many—is an independent, non-collecting museum driven by an uncompromising commitment to artists and their ideas. All exhibitions and events are free and open to the public.

Image: Richard Rezac, Address, installation view at the Renaissance Society, 2018. Photo: Tom Van Eynde.

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Unless otherwise noted,
all events take place at:

Madlener House
4 West Burton Place, Chicago

Gallery and Bookshop Hours:

Wednesday—Saturday, 11am–6pm

312.787.4071

Directions to Madlener House

Accessibility

Events are held in the ballroom on the third floor which is only accessible by stairs.
The first floor of the Madlener House is accessible via an outdoor lift. Please call 312.787.4071 to make arrangements.