Madlener House
4 West Burton Place
Chicago, Illinois 60610
Telephone: 312.787.4071
info@grahamfoundation.org

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I SEE you. Do YOU SEE you?
Fay Victor
Jan 09, 2019 (12pm)
Workshop

Please RSVP

The workshop focuses on building confidence from within and without. It asks how do we see ourselves and how we can help others see us in beneficial ways. Workshop leader Fay Victor—a New York-based sound artist and composer—leads exercises, demonstrations, and discussions in the service of being seen.  RSVP is required and space is limited.

Fay  Victor,  called  “artistically complete”  by the New  York Times, hones a unique vision for the vocalist's role in jazz and improvised music. Victor’s recorded work has been featured in media outlets such as The Wall Street JournalThe San Francisco ChronicleTime Out New York, and The Huffington  Post.  Victor has performed with luminaries such as Randy Weston,  Roswell  Rudd,  Nicole  Mitchell,  Archie  Shepp,  Marc  Ribot, and Tyshawn  Sorey. Performance highlights include those at The  Museum of  Modern  Art  (New York),  Hammer  Museum  (Los Angeles),  Kölner Philharmonie (Germany), De Young Museum  (San Francisco),  Symphony  Space  (New York),  and  Bimhuis  (Netherlands). Victor was the  2017  Herb  Albert/Yaddo  Fellow in  Music  Composition.  Current releases  include  her  album  Wet  Robots (ESP  Disk, July  2018)  with  her  SoundNoiseFUNK  project,   Nicole  Mitchell’s  Maroon  Cloud (FPE Records, August  2018),  and  Marc  Ribot’s   upcoming   Songs of Resistance (September 2018) featuring Victor as well as guests vocalists Tom Waits, Steve Earle, and Meshell Ndegeocello.

Image: Fay Victor. Photo: Richard Koek

For more information on the exhibition, Incense Sweaters & Ice, click here.

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Image: Fay Victor by Eva Kapanzade

Experiments in Communicating Message
Fay Victor with Mike Reed
Jan 09, 2019 (6pm)
Performance

Please RSVP

Presenting a talk, musical performance, and a question and answer session, New York-based sound artist and composer, Fay Victor utilizes music as a vehicle to express thoughts and sounds in a multigenre universe that reflects identity, new music, jazz, blues, house, funk, and free improvisation—recalling references from jazz legend Albert Ayler to the innovative Frank Zappa. In partnership with Chicago-based musician Mike Reed, the two explore message together through jazz.

Fay  Victor,  called  “artistically complete”  by the New  York Times, hones a unique vision for the vocalist's role in jazz and improvised music. Victor’s recorded work has been featured in media outlets such as The Wall Street JournalThe San Francisco ChronicleTime Out New York, and The Huffington  Post.  Victor has performed with luminaries such as Randy Weston,  Roswell  Rudd,  Nicole  Mitchell,  Archie  Shepp,  Marc  Ribot, and Tyshawn  Sorey. Performance highlights include those at The  Museum of  Modern  Art  (New York),  Hammer  Museum  (Los Angeles),  Kölner Philharmonie (Germany), De Young Museum  (San Francisco),  Symphony  Space  (New York),  and  Bimhuis  (Netherlands). Victor was the  2017  Herb  Albert/Yaddo  Fellow in  Music  Composition.  Current releases  include  her  album  Wet  Robots (ESP  Disk, July  2018)  with  her  SoundNoiseFUNK  project,   Nicole  Mitchell’s  Maroon  Cloud (FPE Records, August  2018),  and  Marc  Ribot’s upcoming Songs of Resistance (September 2018) featuring Victor as well as guests vocalists Tom Waits, Steve Earle, and Meshell Ndegeocello.

Mike Reed is a musician, composer, bandleader and arts presenter based in Chicago. In addition to leading or co-leading several working bands, all rooted deeply in jazz and improvised music, he’s the current programming chair of the Chicago Jazz Festival, and the owner and director of the acclaimed performing arts venue Constellation.

Image: Fay Victor. Photo: Richard Koek

For more information on the exhibition, Incense Sweaters & Ice, click here.

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Snarkitecture—The Beach Chicago
Alex Mustonen and Benjamin Porto
Jan 17, 2019 (6pm)
Talk

SOLD OUT

Join us for a talk by Alex Mustonen and Benjamin Porto of the New York-based collaborative design practice Snarkitecture. This event will take place in advance of the unveiling of The Beach, a large-scale interactive installation that will open to the public on Saturday, January 19 in the Aon Grand Ballroom at Navy Pier. Snarkitecture’s work focuses on the reinterpretation of everyday materials within a conceptual approach to create unexpected engagements with our surroundings — centered on the importance of experience, this premise extends to The Beach, an all-white ocean of over one million recyclable, antimicrobial plastic balls.

Following the talk, the bookshop will host a book signing of Snarkitecture’s recent catalogue, published by Phaidon.

Snarkitecture is a New York-based collaborative design practice established to investigate the boundaries between disciplines. The name is drawn from Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of The Snark, a poem describing the “impossible voyage of an improbable crew to find an inconceivable creature.” In its search for the unknown, Snarkitecture creates work that includes large-scale projects, installations and objects.

This talk is presented in partnership with EXPO CHICAGO and Navy Pier. For more information about the upcoming installation The Beach at the Aon Grand Ballroom at Navy Pier click here.

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Arata Isozaki, DEME robot, 1970

An Anatomy of Influence
Thomas Daniell
Jan 24, 2019 (6pm)
Talk

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Containing a wealth of texts and images, Thomas Daniell’s Graham-funded book An Anatomy of Influence elucidates the theory and practice of 12 leading Japanese architects (Hiromi Fujii, Terunobu Fujimori, Hiroshi Hara, Itsuko Hasegawa, Osamu Ishiyama, Arata Isozaki, Toyo Ito, Kengo Kuma, Kazuyo Sejima, Kazuo Shinohara, Shin Takamatsu, and Kiyoshi Sey Takeyama). Rather than the usual array of exquisite yet autonomous buildings, this newly released publication focuses on the hitherto unexplored lives of their architects, and the intellectual, social, and political environment in which they worked. The result is not only a fascinating perspective on modern Japanese architecture, but a profound recasting of our understanding of the modern Japanese architect.

Thomas Daniell is a Professor of Architectural Theory and Criticism at Kyoto University, Japan. A two-time recipient of publication grants from the Graham Foundation, his latest book is An Anatomy of Influence (AA Publications, 2018). His previous books include FOBA: Buildings (Princeton Architectural Press, 2005), After the Crash: Architecture in Post-Bubble Japan (Princeton Architectural Press, 2008), Houses and Gardens of Kyoto (Tuttle, 2010), Kiyoshi Sey Takeyama + Amorphe (Equal Books, 2011), and Kansai 6 (Equal Books, 2011).

Related Graham Foundation supported projects:
2015 Publication grant to Thomas Daniell for An Anatomy of Influence

2008 Publication grant to Thomas Daniell for After the Crash: Architecture in Post-Bubble Japan

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Arakawa and Madeline Gins: Eternal Gradient Opening Reception
Irene Sunwoo, Stephen Hepworth, and Norman Kelley
Feb 07, 2019 (5:30pm)
Opening Reception

Please RSVP

5:30 p.m. Comments by curator Irene Sunwoo; Stephen Hepworth, director of collections at the Reversible Destiny Foundation; and exhibition designers Carrie Norman and Thomas Kelley

6:00–8:00 p.m. Opening reception

Please join us for a reception and introductory remarks by exhibition curator Irene Sunwoo; Stephen Hepworth, director of collections at the Reversible Destiny Foundation; and exhibition designers Carrie Norman and Thomas Kelley to celebrate the opening of our winter exhibition.

Eternal Gradient traces the emergence of architecture as a wellspring of creativity and theoretical exploration for the artist Arakawa (1936–2010) and poet and philosopher Madeline Gins (1941–2014). Including over 40 drawings and a wide-range of archival materials, this presentation illuminates a pivotal moment within a collaborative practice that spanned nearly five-decades.

Eternal Gradient originated at the Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery at Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) and is made possible, in part, by the Estate of Madeline Gins and through a partnership with the Reversible Destiny Foundation.

The exhibition was curated by Irene Sunwoo, GSAPP director of exhibitions and curator of the Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery, with Tiffany Lambert, GSAPP assistant director of exhibitions. The Graham Foundation presentation is organized by Sarah Herda, director, and Ellen Alderman, deputy director of exhibitions and public programs. The exhibition design is by Norman Kelley, a Chicago & New Orleans architecture and design collective founded by Carrie Norman and Thomas Kelley.

Image: Arakawa and Madeline Gins, Drawing for ‘Container of Perceiving,’ 1984. Acrylic, watercolor and graphite on paper. 42 1/2 x 72 3/4 in. Photo: Nicholas Knight. Courtesy Columbia GSAPP. © 2018 Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins

For more information on the exhibition, Eternal Gradient , click here.

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Political Reading of Arakawa+Gins
Léopold Lambert
Feb 21, 2019 (6pm)

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The work of Arakawa and Madeline Gins is usually approached through art theory, philosophy, or even sciences; yet, rarely is it examined through the underlying, yet powerful, political dimension of their groundbreaking work. This presentation will first attempt to demonstrate how all designs are calibrated on a certain idea of what a body is, almost always reinforcing societal normativity and its violence in doing so. It will then illustrate the ways through which Arakawa and Gins designed architectural projects that fundamentally subvert such normativity and, as such, can be read as one of the rare examples of revolutionary political architecture.

Léopold Lambert is a Paris-based, trained architect who collaborated with Madeline Gins in 2013–14. He is the editor-in-chief of the print and online magazine The Funambulist, dedicated to the politics of space and bodies. He is the author of Weaponized Architecture: The Impossibility of Innocence (DPR-Barcelona, 2012); Topie Impitoyable: The Corporeal Politics of the Cloth, the Wall, and the Street (Punctum Books, 2015); La politique du bulldozer: La ruine palestinienne comme projet israélien (Éditions B2, 2016); and States of Emergency: A Spatial History of the French Colonial Continuum (forthcoming, 2019). He has been the recipient of four Graham Foundation grants between 2014 and 2017.

Related Graham Foundation supported projects:

2017 publication grant to Léopold Lambert for The Funambulist
2016 publication grant to Léopold Lambert for The Funambulist
2015 new media grant to Léopold Lambert for The Funambulist Podcast
2014 new media grant to Léopold Lambert for The Funambulist Podcast

Image caption: Léopold Lambert, Human Engineering vs. Arakawa+Gins, collage, 2019

For more information on the exhibition, Eternal Gradient , click here.

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The Funambulist Four Years Later: Our Successes and Failures Are Also Political!
Léopold Lambert
Feb 22, 2019 (12pm)
Talk

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The Funambulist is a magazine that believes that the politics of its production and management should be held to the same standards as the politics of its contents. In this regard, and although self-critique is always challenging, this presentation examines how the magazine meets and fails this mission. Graham grantee Léopold Lambert reflects on the work to date and presents future directions for the publication.

Léopold Lambert is a Paris-based, trained architect who collaborated with Madeline Gins in 2013–14. He is the editor-in-chief of the print and online magazine The Funambulist, dedicated to the politics of space and bodies. He is the author of Weaponized Architecture: The Impossibility of Innocence (DPR-Barcelona, 2012); Topie Impitoyable: The Corporeal Politics of the Cloth, the Wall, and the Street (Punctum Books, 2015); La politique du bulldozer: La ruine palestinienne comme projet israélien (Éditions B2, 2016); and States of Emergency: A Spatial History of the French Colonial Continuum (forthcoming, 2019). He has been the recipient of four Graham Foundation grants between 2014 and 2017.

Related Graham Foundation supported projects:

2017 Publication grant to Léopold Lambert for The Funambulist
2016 Publication grant to Léopold Lambert for The Funambulist
2015 New Media grant to Léopold Lambert for The Funambulist Podcast
2014 New Media grant to Léopold Lambert for The Funambulist Podcast

Image caption: The 20 first issues of The Funambulist since September 2015

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Atlas Unlimited: Entr’acte
Karthik Pandian and Andros Zins-Browne with Dr. Tasha K. Vorderstrasse and Sami Ismat
Mar 01, 2019 (7pm)
Performance

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At the midpoint of their unfolding series of exhibitions, Atlas Unlimited (supported by a 2018 Graham Foundation Grant to Individuals), artist Karthik Pandian and choreographer Andros Zins-Browne present “Entr’acte,” a lecture in the presence of an object. The lecture, delivered by archaeologist Dr. Tasha K. Vorderstrasse (Oriental Institute, Chicago) concerns a fragment of a sculpture found in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. Installed in the Madlener House for one night only, the object will rest on a base that the artists have produced in collaboration with Chicago-based furniture designer Casey Lurie. “Entr’acte” is presented concurrently with Pandian and Zins-Browne’s solo exhibition, Atlas Unlimited (Acts V-VI), at the Logan Center for the Arts at the University of Chicago, which runs from February 1–March 17, 2019. “Entr’acte” is produced in collaboration with emerging Syrian theater-maker, Sami Ismat.

American artist Karthik Pandian has held solo exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art; Bétonsalon, Paris; Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis; and White Flag Projects, St. Louis, amongst others. His work was featured in the inaugural Made in L.A. at the Hammer Museum and La Triennale: Intense Proximity at the Palais de Tokyo as well as in group exhibitions such as Adventures of the Black Square: Abstract Art and Society 1915–-–2015 at Whitechapel Gallery; Film as Sculpture at Wiels Contemporary Art Centre, Brussels; and the 4th Marrakech Biennial, Higher Atlas. Pandian holds an MFA from Art Center College of Design and a BA from Brown University. He lives and works in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he teaches video, sculpture, and performance at Harvard University.

Andros Zins-Browne is an American choreographer who lives in Brussels and New York City. After receiving a degree in Art Semiotics from Brown University, he went on to study dance at PARTS in Brussels and in the fine arts department of the Jan van Eyck Academy in Maastricht. Zins-Browne's performances cross between stage and exhibition spaces including: Centre Pompidou Paris; ICA London; HAU Berlin; Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam; DeSingel Antwerp; EMPAC, Troy, NY; Kaaitheater Brussels; and the Impulse Festival, Düsseldorf where he received the Goethe Institute Award for The Host. His solo Already Unmade, a commission by The Boghossian Foundation, has recently been performed at the BOZAR Museum, Brussels; The Whitney Museum of American Art, in New York City; the Rockbund Art Museum, Shanghai; and Lafayette Anticipations, Paris.

Sami Ismat is a theatre and performance maker from Damascus, Syria currently living in Chicago as a refugee.

Casey Lurie is an independent designer based in Chicago.

Tasha Vorderstrasse is a Near Eastern archaeologist who focuses on questions of cultural identity and exchange.

Special thanks to builder Anthony Adcock

Related Graham Foundation supported projects:

2018 exhibition grant to Karthik Pandian & Andros Zins-Browne for Atlas Unlimited (Acts V—VI) at the Logan Center for the Arts at the University of Chicago, February 1–March 17, 2019

Image: Karthik Pandian and Andros Zins-Browne with De Looizemaanen, Atlas Unlimited Act I: Carnaval, Netwerk Aalst. Photo: Karthik Pandian

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Satellite Citizens: Cartographies and Cosmologies
Ingrid Burrington, Fred Scharmen, Design Earth, and Jonathan Solomon
Mar 07, 2019 (6pm)
Panel Discussion

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Satellite Citizens brings together Dimensions of Citizenship participants and catalog essayists to discuss the past, present, and future of technology and space exploration. Who is excluded and included when we gaze upward to the cosmos or delve deep into the network? Panelists include writer Ingrid Burrington, Rania Ghosn and El Hadi Jazairy of the collaborative practice Design Earth, and Fred Scharmen. Moderated by Jonathan Solomon, director of the Department of Architecture, Interior Architecture, and Designed Objects at School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC).

This event is presented concurrently with the Chicago presentation of the Graham funded exhibition Dimensions of Citizenship: Architecture and Belonging from the Body to the Cosmos, a reinstallation of the official US Pavilion at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition of the Venice Biennale, at Wrightwood 659, which runs from February 28 through April 27, 2019.

Ingrid Burrington writes about the Internet, politics, and art, and has been published in The Atlantic, The Nation, ProPublica, San Francisco Art Quarterly, Dissent, and elsewhere. She’s given talks at conferences both in the US and abroad, and her art has been exhibited in galleries in New York, Tokyo, Leipzig, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and many other cities.

Led by Rania Ghosn and El Hadi Jazairy, Design Earth examines the geographies of urban systems—such as energy, trash, water, and agriculture—to prompt the debate on the techno-environment in the age of climate change. The design research practice has exhibited its works at the Venice Biennale and other leading international architecture events and has received numerous accolades, including the Young Architects Prize from the Architectural League of New York. Their After Oil project was collected by The Museum of Modern Art. Ghosn and Jazairy each hold Doctor of Design degrees from the Harvard Graduate School of Design, where they founded the journal New Geographies and were the respective editors for NG2: Landscapes of Energy and NG4: Scales of the Earth. They have authored numerous books, including the Graham Foundation grant-supported Geostories (Actar, 2018) and Geographies of Trash (Actar, 2015) as well as recent essays and projects published in Domus, Journal of Architectural Education, Avery Review, and Perspecta, among others. Ghosn is Associate Professor of Architecture and Urbanism at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s School of Architecture + Planning, and Jazairy is Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning.

Fred Scharmen teaches architecture and urban design at Morgan State University's School of Architecture and Planning. His work as a designer and researcher is about how architects imagine new spaces for new speculative future worlds, and about who is invited into those worlds. His most recently completed projects, with the Working Group on Adaptive Systems, include a mile-and-a-half long scale model of the solar system in downtown Baltimore (in collaboration with nine artists who made the planets), and a pillow fort for the Baltimore Museum of Art, based on Gottfried Semper's Four Elements of Architecture. His writing has been published in the Journal of Architectural EducationLogCLOGVolume, and Domus. His architectural criticism has appeared in the Architect’s Newspaper, and in the local alt-weekly Baltimore City Paper.

Jonathan Solomon is associate professor and director of Architecture, Interior Architecture, and Designed Objects at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His drawings, analytical and counterfactual urban narratives, appear in Cities Without Ground (ORO, 2012), and 13 Projects for the Sheridan Expressway (PAPress, 2004). Solomon edits Forty-Five, a journal of outside research, and was curator of the US Pavilion at the 2010 Venice Architecture Biennale. His interests include extra-disciplinary, post-growth, and nonanthroponormative design futures. Solomon received a BA from Columbia University and an MArch from Princeton University and is a licensed architect in the State of Illinois.

Related Graham Foundation supported projects:

2018 grant to the School of the Art Institute Of Chicago & The University of Chicago for Dimensions of Citizenship: US Pavilion, 16th International Architecture Exhibition

2017 grant to Rania Ghosn and El Hadi Jazairy for the publication Geostories

Image: Cosmorama by Design Earth at the 2018 U.S. Pavilion. Photo © Tom Harris. Courtesy of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Chicago.

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Pita
Lampo Performance Series
Mar 16, 2019 (8pm)
Performance

RSVP required

Pita is Peter Rehberg. In this performance—his first US solo date in more than a decade—he offers a semi-improvised electronic music concert with a new modular set-up.

Peter Rehberg (b.1968, London) cofounded the influential Mego label in 1994 and soon after began recording under the name Pita. His first solo release, Seven Tons for Free, came out in 1996, melding noise with techno. Since then he has produced over a dozen albums, covering an astonishing variety of experimental electronic styles. The Get Out / Get Down / Get Off trilogy received broad international critical acclaim and helped define the radical underground experimental electronic scene of the 1990s. He has played numerous concerts all over the world, including SONAR, ATP, CTM Berlin, MUTEK, Donaufestival, Le Guess Who?, and Atonal. In 1999 he won the Prix Ars Electronica for Digital Musics & Sound Art. In addition to his solo work, he is best known for long term collaborations with Stephen O’Malley, as KTL, and with Jim O’Rourke and Christian Fennesz as Fenn O’Berg. He also runs the groundbreaking label, Editions Mego, which has released albums by artists such as Hecker, Mark Fell, Fennesz, and Kevin Drumm.

In May 2009 Rehberg performed at Lampo with Marcus Schmickler. He also appeared at Lampo in March 2003, when he premiered Get Off.

Since 2010 the Graham Foundation has supported and partnered with Lampo to produce this performance series held at the Madlener House. Lampo, founded in 1997, is a non-profit organization for experimental music and intermedia projects.

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In Search of Philip Johnson
Mark Lamster
Mar 28, 2019 (6pm)
Talk

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Most people in the design world know Philip Johnson, or think they do: He was the controversial architect with the round glasses who built a glass house and gave us the chippendale-capped AT&T Building in New York. But who, really, was he? In the course of his long life, he had a series of careers—curator, critic, journalist, politician—of which architect was only one. He was intellectually peripatetic. His buildings ranged widely in style and quality. How did he become this way? Who exactly was this complex man? Johnson biographer and Graham grantee Mark Lamster will talk about the process of figuring out Johnson, and putting that story into narrative form for his new book, The Man in the Glass House: Philip Johnson, Architect of the Modern Century.

Mark Lamster is the architecture critic of the Dallas Morning News and a professor at the architecture school of the University of Texas at Arlington. In 2017, he was a Loeb Fellow at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and The Wall Street Journal, and he is a regular contributor to numerous magazines.

Related Graham Foundation supported projects:
2010 research grant to Mark Lamster for Philip Johnson: A Biography

Image: The Glass House, in New Canaan, CT

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Third Hand
Vlatka Horvat
Apr 04, 2019 (7pm)
Performance

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The starting point for Vlatka Horvat’s performance Third Hand is a collection of scenes, images, and moments that other artists and writers have recounted to her from memory. Responding to this unruly catalogue of vivid fragments, all of which focus on the performing body, Horvat creates a work that is somewhere between collage, animated archive, partial reenactment, and memory palace. Third Hand explores the ways in which performance lingers despite the processes of distortion, displacement, and erasure which take place in memory and over time, and which are amplified through the act of narration.

The human body summoned in Third Hand is a problematic, transforming, and misremembered one—mistaken for animal, ghost, object, or machine; hesitant and determined; exhausted and persisting; ecstatic, working, resting, and playing, as it is made and remade in language and in the moment of performance.

Work in progress developed and performed with Michael Thomas.

Vlatka Horvat works across a wide range of forms, including sculp­ture, installation, drawing, performance, photography, and writing. Her work is presented internationally in a variety of contexts—in museums and galleries, theater and dance festivals, and in public space. Recent exhibitions include: Croatian national Pavilion at the 16th Architecture Biennale, Museums Sheffield, Renata Fabbri Gallery (Milan), Eastwards Prospectus (Bucharest), Museum of Contemporary Art Zagreb, Bard Center for Curatorial Studies (upstate NY), Wilfried Lentz Gallery (Rotterdam), CAPRI (Düssel­dorf). Her performances have been commissioned and presented by venues across Europe, North America, and beyond, including HAU – Hebbel am Ufer (Berlin), LIFT – London International Festival of Theatre, PACT Zollverein (Essen), Tanzquartier Wien (Vienna), Outpost for Contemporary Art (LA), and many others. Born in what used to be Yugoslavia, Horvat moved to the US as a teenager. After 20 years in the States, she currently lives in London, where she teaches in the Fine Art department at Central St Martins, University of the Arts London.

IN>TIME is Chicago’s triannual winter-long performance festival. The IN>TIME Festival features a season of performances, presentations, and exhibitions at venues throughout the city from local, national, and international artists.

Image: courtesy of the artist

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Near/Miss: Bollingen Prize Poetry Reading
Charles Bernstein
Apr 17, 2019 (6pm)
Talk

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Charles Bernstein is the recipient of 2019 Bollingen Prize for American Poetry, the premier prize for lifetime achievement in poetry, administered by Yale University. He will read poems from Near/Miss (University of Chicago Press, 2018), honored by the prize, and more recent work. Presented in relationship to the exhibition Eternal Gradient, Bernstein will also read works in response to Arakawa and Madeline Gins’ work, reflecting his decades-long friendship with the artists.

This event is presented in partnership with the Poetry Foundation.

Charles Bernstein is the author of Near/Miss (University of Chicago Press, 2018), Pitch of Poetry (essays) (Chicago, 2016),  Recalculating (Chicago, 2013) and Attack of the Difficult Poems: Essays and Inventions (Chicago, 2011).  In 2010, Farrar, Straus & Giroux published All the Whiskey in Heaven: Selected Poems. Bernstein is Donald T. Regan Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is co-director of PennSound. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

The Poetry Foundation, publisher of Poetry magazine, is an independent literary organization committed to a vigorous presence for poetry in our culture. It exists to discover and celebrate the best poetry and to place it before the largest possible audience.


Image caption: Arakawa’s cover for Bernstein’s book Islets/Irritations Jordan Davies, 1983

For more information on the exhibition, Eternal Gradient , click here.

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Possible Mediums
Kelly Bair, Kristy Balliet, Adam Fure, and Kyle Miller
Apr 25, 2019 (6pm)
Panel Discussion

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Join us for a panel discussion to launch the recently published Graham funded book Possible Mediums. The editors Kelly Bair, Kristy Balliet, Adam Fure, and Kyle Miller will exhibit and present the Possible Mediums book and will be joined in discussion by Zoë Ryan.

Possible Mediums presents a collection of sixteen speculative design mediums by emerging architects. Each chapter defines an active medium in contemporary architecture through descriptions, drawings, and objects. Possible Mediums arranges projects according to shared technical and aesthetic traits, creating a vibrant taxonomy of design. Descriptive texts explain the working principles behind each medium and introduce design concepts intended to inspire students and professionals alike. Through its many contributors, Possible Mediums establishes design as a collective endeavor propelled by the open exchange of ideas and techniques. Possible Mediums is not a systematic theory, a manifesto, or a banal survey; it is a projection of architecture and knowledge to come.

Kelly Bair is Partner of BairBalliet, Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor at University of Illinois at Chicago School of Architecture.

Kristy Balliet is Partner of BairBalliet and Faculty at Southern California Institute of Architecture.

Adam Fure is Principal of T+E+A+M and Assistant Professor at University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning.

Kyle Miller is an Assistant Professor at Syracuse University School of Architecture.

Zoë Ryan is the John H. Bryan Chair and Curator of Architecture and Design at the Art Institute of Chicago. A curator and author, her projects focus on exploring the impact of architecture and design on society.

Related Graham supported projects:
2018 grant to Kelly Bair, Kristy Balliet, Adam Fure, and Kyle Miller for the publication Possible Mediums

Image: Cover of Possible Mediums, 2018.

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James Hoff
Lampo Performance Series
Apr 27, 2019 (8pm)
Performance

RSVP required; Available soon

James Hoff’s work often relies on misusing technology as a generative act.

For Lampo and the Graham Foundation, he presents a site-specific version of his most recent audiovisual project HOBO UFO, which uses a custom hack of Google Maps’ Street View to make the platform sound reactive. Hoff’s performance takes place physically and virtually in Chicago, starting at Madlener House and then moving beyond, driven by the real-time music the artist creates from pilfered radio frequencies that transmit GPS and other data streams.

James Hoff (b.1975, Fort Wayne, Ind.) works in a variety of media, including painting, sound, writing, and performance. In recent years, his interests have focused on language and media systems at the intersection of developing technologies and traditional artistic genre forms. He has created paintings and music using computer viruses and developed several bodies of work that examine how the language of network communication has changed our contemporary notions of landscape and nature.

Hoff is also one of the founders of Primary Information, a nonprofit arts organization devoted to publishing artists’ books and art historical documents. He has two releases forthcoming on PAN in 2019, HOBO UFO (Cherynobyl) and an LP of works for French horn and tuba.

James Hoff first performed for Lampo in December 2015.

Since 2010 the Graham Foundation has supported and partnered with Lampo to produce this performance series held at the Madlener House. Lampo, founded in 1997, is a non-profit organization for experimental music and intermedia projects.

Artist Talk: Hoff describes his studio practice as a painter and sound artist, including his reliance on self-distributing and language-based systems, which for him are both metaphors for creation and generative tools. He elaborates on his HOBO UFO project and discusses an “ambient capitalism” and its relationship to the work and the exclusion zone around Chernobyl and Pripyat, Ukraine. Lampo Annex, Monadnock Building, 53 W. Jackson Blvd. #1656. Friday, April 26, 6pm.

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And then when I went to Chicago, that's when I had these outer space experiences and went to the other planets.
Anne Dessing
May 02, 2019 (7pm)
Talk

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As the 2018–19 Douglas A. Garofalo Fellow, Anne Dessing has done research on architectural elements that divide space, such as walls, doors, windows, columns, fences, arches, and gates. Through a pictorial essay of architectural elements from Detroit, St Louis, and Chicago, she will tell a story about surreal situations in the Midwest.

Anne Dessing, an architect based in Amsterdam, is the 2018–19 Douglas A. Garofalo Fellow at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Since graduating from the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture in 2012, she has been awarded grants from the Creative Industries Fund NL and the Prince Bernhard Cultural Foundation a.o. Her practice, Studio Anne Dessing, operates at the intersection of art and architecture. She researches architecture through exhibitions, installations, drawings, models, interiors, and (temporary) buildings. Dessing has taught at the Academy of Architecture in Amsterdam and Rotterdam, the Rietveld Academy, and the Chair of Interiors Buildings Cities at TU Delft.

About the Douglas A. Garofalo Fellowship

Named in honor of architect and educator Doug Garofalo (1958–2011), this nine-month teaching fellowship—supported with a grant from the Graham Foundation—provides emerging designers the opportunity to teach studio and seminar courses in the undergraduate and graduate programs and conduct independent design research. The fellowship also includes a public lecture at the Graham Foundation and an exhibition at the UIC School of Architecture. To learn more about the fellowship, click here.

 

Image: Anne Dessing, Harold’s Chicken Shack W 87th St, rendering

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Unless otherwise noted,
all events take place at:

Madlener House
4 West Burton Place, Chicago

Gallery and Bookshop Hours:

Wednesday—Saturday, 11am–6pm

312.787.4071

Directions to Madlener House

Accessibility

Events are held in the ballroom on the third floor which is only accessible by stairs.
The first floor of the Madlener House is accessible via an outdoor lift. Please call 312.787.4071 to make arrangements.